Bring him to justice – justice served

George Flowers, aka Mr Flowas, has entered a plea of guilty to the charges against him and the court has accepted that plea. Victim impact statements and sentencing will take place at a later date.

Over the past five or six years, I have written several blogs under the general title “Bring him to justice”. These detail the efforts of the Toronto Police Service to apprehend then extradite George Flowers on several charges of aggravated sexual assault. I’ve been looking forward to writing this particular piece for a long time. I have no confirmed information, but my personal hope is that he will be deported to Jamaica once he’s done his time.

As I have written before, I know people he dated so can imagine they find this a great relief and can take some solace that this monster is off the streets. On a personal level I am pleased with this outcome for it spares my friends and those other women who had the courage to come forward the possibility of having their carefully rebuilt lives exposed and torn apart in court. His admission of guilt is, in my opinion, the only decent thing he’s done throughout this entire process. Perhaps these people can now find some peace in knowing George Flowers will never again taste freedom on Canadian soil.

I would be remiss if I failed to thank Detective Sergeant Nancy Johnston of the Toronto Police Service for her dogged efforts in getting Flowers back from Jamaica to face the courts. Her determination and hard work made this possible.

I won’t say it’s over. Yes, the legal portion of this is done. But for those victims who have tested HIV positive since their encounter with him, it doesn’t end so easily. They still have to live with what is now considered a chronic disease and worry that they may serial convert and develop AIDS. They have a life sentence while he’ll be freed after he serves his sentence.

If you, or anyone you know has been a victim of sexual assault, not only involving George Flowers, but any other person, please, please, don’t be afraid to report it. Only by doing so can these monsters be removed from society.

Cat.

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Please explain your statement

Yesterday there was a murder on the Toronto subway. According to both news reports and interviews with the investigating officer, a man deliberately pushed another individual in front of an oncoming subway train. Based upon video evidence provided by the Toronto Transit Commission (TTC) and statements from witnesses, the police have charged this man with first degree murder, but the investigation is still active.

As is usual in cases such as this, the media has interviewed people who were either on the platform at the time, or were affected by the closure of the station. Naturally people were upset with having to use shuttle buses, or walk a block to the nearest open station, but their upset usually subsided when they learned the reason for the closure. One man however, had a different view. His comment was “it’s the TTC’s fault.”

Pardon me. Would you kindly explain how you figure it is the TTC’s fault that one person deliberately killing another on TTC property is the fault of the transit service? I readily admit that there are times I’m not a fan of the service provided, but generally I find the service to be efficient. And what was the TTC’s fault? Was it that they let a person onto the system who may have been angry at the world? Or that they had to close the Bloor/Yonge station for the police investigation, which caused you some inconvenience? Granted yesterday was hot (92F, feeling like 109F [33C and 43C]) but a one block walk to an open station wouldn’t have been too uncomfortable.

City Hall has conducted a study on the feasibility of installing barriers such as Tokyo uses to prevent passengers from falling/jumping/being pushed in front of trains. The cost of upgrading stations and installing these barriers is currently estimated at over a billion dollars. Would our man who blames the TTC be willing to see a fare increase to help offset this cost? I doubt it.

Blaming the TTC for the actions of one individual, not an employee of the system, for something beyond the control of the TTC is childish. The ease with which he made that statement makes me suspect he is one of those people who constantly blames others for any inconvenience he encounters. About time he learned the world isn’t out to get him.

My sympathies to out to the family and friends of the man who died.

Cat.

Do it your way

Every once in a while, someone will look at some of my photos, or read something I’ve written and suggest that I should teach photography and/or writing. That presents a problem for me.

I’m sure that each of you is very good at some pastime that gives you a sense of accomplishment. But, how would you go about explaining to somebody else just how you do it? That’s the problem with my photography and writing. Oh, I could probably teach each, but the course would be twenty minutes tops. I’ll try here to explain how I do what I do.

Photography: My philosophy is simple – if something catches your attention, snap it. You may look at the image on the camera screen and not see what you expected, but wait until you get it up on the computer screen when you process it. (I do digital photography, so my comments are restricted to computer processing.) The larger image may show you something surprising that you can turn into a beautiful photo. The photo at the top of this is an example of a photo I thought was “okay” until I saw it on the monitor, then it went up in my estimation.

Take advice if offered. I’ve had some free-lance photographers give me some advice that I think is worth passing on. First, remember that a digital camera darkens an image about 30 – 40% from what you see with your eye. You’ll want to restore that brightness before anything else. This of course wouldn’t apply if you feel the darker image is more effective.

Next, a free-lancer told me to avoid weddings if at all possible because you’ll never please everyone.

Finally, if you want to be a free-lance news photographer, the best advice I was given for this was “f8 and be there”. You can’t take the shot if you aren’t at the scene and an aperture of f8 will give you a decent depth of field.

As I said, I do digital photography and process my own work. There are many photo processing programmes available. My personal preference is a Corel programme called “Paintshop”. Some people prefer Adobe’s Photoshop. I’ve used both and prefer Paintshop. If you can, try as many as you can – some places offer free trial copies – before spending your money on one.

The choice of camera is up to the user. Many of my best work was done with a Canon point and shoot, including the header photo. I currently use a Canon DSLR, but depending upon my plans for the day, I have often used the camera in my phone. The quality of phone cameras has improved greatly.

I’m torn about suggesting photography courses. Yes, I can see the benefits for some people, but when I told an artist friend it had been suggested I take one, her comment was “Why? That would only ruin you. The course would only teach you to take photos the way the instructor does.” If you feel you’d benefit from one, go for it. As my friend said, if you feel competent, save your money.

In photography the most important advice I was given was that you have to have imagination and the ability to think outside the box. Photography is as much about feeling as technique.

Writing: I’ve always written, at least back as far as Grade 5. I was fortunate in having teachers who encouraged my writing and have since received advice from others. There are many courses in creative writing available through community colleges that you can take. My ex-partner was part of a group of writers who would meet once a week and present short stories for criticism. Some members were published authors; some were taking courses and others just sat down to write. Through the members of this group (I was a casual member since they often met at our house) I learned the proper format for submitting stories, but that’s about all.

Most often, aspiring writers are told “write what you know”. That is fine if you’re writing factual articles and stories. I have a blog and frequently write opinion pieces that I laughingly refer to as “rants, raves and reasoned discussions – reader’s choice.” The main exception to that is a series of blogs under the general title “Bring him to justice”. This series concerns the attempts by the Toronto Police Service to arrest a man charged with several counts of aggravated sexual assault. This series is factual and, full disclosure here, I’m doing it because I know several people he dated.

For my fiction, it’s rather difficult to write fiction strictly sticking to “what you know”. If I’m writing fiction, the process usually starts with me asking myself “what if…?” then writing a piece to answer the question.

Perhaps the best advice the writer me was given was “write the way you speak.” If you don’t use multi-syllable words as part of your usual vocabulary, don’t use them in your writing. I sometimes paraphrase this as “if you don’t use ten dollar words all the time, don’t use them in your writing, even if you get them half-off. You’ll probably mis-use them.” Something else – spelling counts. Spell-check is great in most cases, but if you use a homophones – and yes, I had to check the definition of this – such as “hear” or “here”, spell-check won’t catch it. Proofread, then proofread again.

There. My courses on photography and writing are finished. As the title suggests “do it your way.” Class dismissed.

Remember to hug an artist – we need love too.

Cat.

Bring him to justice – on Canadian soil

“He’s back.” Those are the words that greeted me when I answered an early morning phone call today.

George Flowers, aka Mr Flowas, has been returned from Jamaica, processed, charged with several counts of aggravated sexual assault and currently sits in a jail cell somewhere in or around Toronto. Not sure when he will appear in court for a bail hearing, but my best guess is sometime today. In my view, this will be a mere formality and bail will be denied as he is a flight risk – it just took almost four years to get him from Jamaica. As and when more information becomes available and can be confirmed, I’ll post it.

Once again, if you had sexual relations with this man but didn’t come forward earlier because you didn’t think he’d be caught or were afraid, well, they caught him. He’s in jail. And don’t be afraid any longer. Please contact Detective Sergeant Nancy Johnston at the Toronto Police Service, 55 Division, at 416-808-5505. You don’t have to have tested positive – DS Johnston wants to hear from you.

Cat.

Bring him to justice – latest news

Flowers will be returning to Toronto tomorrow, June 22. According to the officer in charge, once he is processed, there will be a press conference. My guess is either very late tomorrow or early Friday.

As I wrote previously, if you dated this man and haven’t come forward, please contact Detective Nancy Johnston at 55 Division, Toronto Police Service at 416-808-5505.

Cat.

(Posted from my phone. When I get home tomorrow, I’ll do a proper edit). C

They’re at it again

You may recall last year, when Black Lives Matter hijacked the Toronto Pride Parade in order to get some demands acknowledged. Eventually, Pride Toronto told the Toronto Police Service they would not be permitted to enter a float in this year’s parade, but individual officers would be permitted to march – provided they did it in plain clothes, with no indication they were officers. By the way, I heard last week Black Lives has not registered to be in this year’s parade.

Now they’ve demanded that school resource officers be removed from all schools in Toronto as they claim the kids are “intimidated” by the officers. Oh, really? In response to that claim, here is an excerpt from an article by Sue-Ann Levy in today’s Toronto issue of 24 hrs:

They’ve coached the school rugby team.

They’ve established a girl’s club to bring bullies and their victims together.

They’ve helped 16-year-old students set up their first bank account and learn how to write resumes.

They coordinated a community garden.

They deliver a series of lectures to high school students on drug abuse, drinking and driving, partying, bullying, sexting and social media.

Yet Black Lives Matter considers the Metropolitan Police School Resource Officers”dangerous” and “intimidating”. Of course they don’t explain why they apply these labels to these officers, just make the blanket statement. At today’s Police Service Board meeting, where there were many people wanting to speak both for and against cancelling this programme, BLM resorted to their usual tactics of disrupting the meeting. I guess their philosophy is “if we can’t win with logic, we’ll win with noise”. Incidentally, among the many wishing to speak are many students speaking in favour of keeping the programme. But, and this is strictly my opinion, BLM will do the same as they did with Pride – stir up shit, then move on, having contributed nothing but strife for others to resolve.

Last year, a person on a phone-in show asked a good question: If black lives matter so much, why aren’t these people out in the community trying to improve things for black youth? My response to this would be this: They would much rather conduct demonstrations and sit-ins rather than expend the energy to actually do something. You can be certain that if they are successful in having the officers removed from schools (and I pray they aren’t) they won’t be in the schools helping out. In fact I rather hope they wouldn’t be there, indoctrinating the students in their way of thinking.

From their actions here in Toronto, I am left with the impression that black lives, other than their own, don’t really matter to these people, but the organization’s name gives them a platform to spew their anti-police venom.

Cat.

Bring him to justice – coming home

I’ve waited a long time to write these words: I have received and confirmed information that George Flowers will be returning to Toronto on June 21 accompanied by a member of the Toronto Police Service. This has been a long time coming because his legal counsel exhausted every possible legal means to keep him in Jamaica.

I urge any of my followers and readers that if you have had sexual relations with this man, or know anyone who has, to come forward if you haven’t already done so. Contact Detective Sergeant Nancy Johnston at 55 Division, Toronto Police Service, at 416-808-5505. As Detective Johnston told me when I first started writing about this, you don’t need to have tested positive to have a valid complaint. Just the fact you had relations without knowing his status is enough.

Cat.