Bring him to justice – justice served

George Flowers, aka Mr Flowas, has entered a plea of guilty to the charges against him and the court has accepted that plea. Victim impact statements and sentencing will take place at a later date.

Over the past five or six years, I have written several blogs under the general title “Bring him to justice”. These detail the efforts of the Toronto Police Service to apprehend then extradite George Flowers on several charges of aggravated sexual assault. I’ve been looking forward to writing this particular piece for a long time. I have no confirmed information, but my personal hope is that he will be deported to Jamaica once he’s done his time.

As I have written before, I know people he dated so can imagine they find this a great relief and can take some solace that this monster is off the streets. On a personal level I am pleased with this outcome for it spares my friends and those other women who had the courage to come forward the possibility of having their carefully rebuilt lives exposed and torn apart in court. His admission of guilt is, in my opinion, the only decent thing he’s done throughout this entire process. Perhaps these people can now find some peace in knowing George Flowers will never again taste freedom on Canadian soil.

I would be remiss if I failed to thank Detective Sergeant Nancy Johnston of the Toronto Police Service for her dogged efforts in getting Flowers back from Jamaica to face the courts. Her determination and hard work made this possible.

I won’t say it’s over. Yes, the legal portion of this is done. But for those victims who have tested HIV positive since their encounter with him, it doesn’t end so easily. They still have to live with what is now considered a chronic disease and worry that they may serial convert and develop AIDS. They have a life sentence while he’ll be freed after he serves his sentence.

If you, or anyone you know has been a victim of sexual assault, not only involving George Flowers, but any other person, please, please, don’t be afraid to report it. Only by doing so can these monsters be removed from society.

Cat.

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I’d rather do it myself

I found the following in the comments on WordPress this morning. I’ve removed all references and links that could get me in trouble with WordPress (again).

Hi. I see that you don’t update your page too often. I know that writing content is time consuming and boring.
But did you know that there is a tool that allows you to create new articles using existing content (from
article directories or other pages from your niche)?

And it does it very well. The new articles are high quality and
pass the copyscape test. You should try *** tools

Let’s look at this critically. “I see that you don’t update your page too often”. If I didn’t know the message came from a bot, I’d be flattered that someone checked my page so frequently that they’d noticed.

“I know that writing content is time consuming and boring.” Sorry, but I don’t consider writing as either time consuming or boring. If you consider writing such an onerous task, you shouldn’t be doing it.

“But did you know that there is a tool that allows you to create new articles using existing content (from article directories or other pages from your niche)?” Great. So there is a tool that will write articles for me. Articles that won’t scan the way my writing scans (or doesn’t – your choice) and may not be on a topic I would even consider writing about. Or is this really saying “we have this fabulous tool that will plagiarize other articles and mould them into something new for you.”

I write about whatever stirs my interest and arouses some feeling. That’s why I may not update every day, or week. It depends upon what’s wound me up and whether I feel I can get a decent blog from it. The series “Bring him to justice” is a good example of not writing on a daily or weekly basis. This series deals with a man who didn’t tell his partners he was HIV positive – for at least a decade! As I know people he dated, I’m quite passionate about seeing him before the courts, but I only update when I have concrete information. I won’t print rumours for fear they may jeopardise the Crown’s case or possibly give his victims false hope.

Finally, what the hell is the “copyscape test”?

So, thanks for your offer, but I’d rather do it myself.

Cat.

Bring him to justice – pending

No, I haven’t forgotten about this. I’ll keep writing until the matter is resolved.

George Flowers, aka Mr Flowas, is still in an Ontario jail awaiting his day in court. The wheels of justice are grinding very slowly and finely in this case. The Crown wants to make certain every tittle is in place and every “t” has its crossbar before proceeding. I’m watching the situation carefully and as soon as I have something concrete to report, I’ll do so. I’ve heard many rumours, but other than say that, I won’t dignify them by repeating any of them here.

I ask that you be patient and be assured justice will be served properly and in due course.

Cat.

Do it your way

Every once in a while, someone will look at some of my photos, or read something I’ve written and suggest that I should teach photography and/or writing. That presents a problem for me.

I’m sure that each of you is very good at some pastime that gives you a sense of accomplishment. But, how would you go about explaining to somebody else just how you do it? That’s the problem with my photography and writing. Oh, I could probably teach each, but the course would be twenty minutes tops. I’ll try here to explain how I do what I do.

Photography: My philosophy is simple – if something catches your attention, snap it. You may look at the image on the camera screen and not see what you expected, but wait until you get it up on the computer screen when you process it. (I do digital photography, so my comments are restricted to computer processing.) The larger image may show you something surprising that you can turn into a beautiful photo. The photo at the top of this is an example of a photo I thought was “okay” until I saw it on the monitor, then it went up in my estimation.

Take advice if offered. I’ve had some free-lance photographers give me some advice that I think is worth passing on. First, remember that a digital camera darkens an image about 30 – 40% from what you see with your eye. You’ll want to restore that brightness before anything else. This of course wouldn’t apply if you feel the darker image is more effective.

Next, a free-lancer told me to avoid weddings if at all possible because you’ll never please everyone.

Finally, if you want to be a free-lance news photographer, the best advice I was given for this was “f8 and be there”. You can’t take the shot if you aren’t at the scene and an aperture of f8 will give you a decent depth of field.

As I said, I do digital photography and process my own work. There are many photo processing programmes available. My personal preference is a Corel programme called “Paintshop”. Some people prefer Adobe’s Photoshop. I’ve used both and prefer Paintshop. If you can, try as many as you can – some places offer free trial copies – before spending your money on one.

The choice of camera is up to the user. Many of my best work was done with a Canon point and shoot, including the header photo. I currently use a Canon DSLR, but depending upon my plans for the day, I have often used the camera in my phone. The quality of phone cameras has improved greatly.

I’m torn about suggesting photography courses. Yes, I can see the benefits for some people, but when I told an artist friend it had been suggested I take one, her comment was “Why? That would only ruin you. The course would only teach you to take photos the way the instructor does.” If you feel you’d benefit from one, go for it. As my friend said, if you feel competent, save your money.

In photography the most important advice I was given was that you have to have imagination and the ability to think outside the box. Photography is as much about feeling as technique.

Writing: I’ve always written, at least back as far as Grade 5. I was fortunate in having teachers who encouraged my writing and have since received advice from others. There are many courses in creative writing available through community colleges that you can take. My ex-partner was part of a group of writers who would meet once a week and present short stories for criticism. Some members were published authors; some were taking courses and others just sat down to write. Through the members of this group (I was a casual member since they often met at our house) I learned the proper format for submitting stories, but that’s about all.

Most often, aspiring writers are told “write what you know”. That is fine if you’re writing factual articles and stories. I have a blog and frequently write opinion pieces that I laughingly refer to as “rants, raves and reasoned discussions – reader’s choice.” The main exception to that is a series of blogs under the general title “Bring him to justice”. This series concerns the attempts by the Toronto Police Service to arrest a man charged with several counts of aggravated sexual assault. This series is factual and, full disclosure here, I’m doing it because I know several people he dated.

For my fiction, it’s rather difficult to write fiction strictly sticking to “what you know”. If I’m writing fiction, the process usually starts with me asking myself “what if…?” then writing a piece to answer the question.

Perhaps the best advice the writer me was given was “write the way you speak.” If you don’t use multi-syllable words as part of your usual vocabulary, don’t use them in your writing. I sometimes paraphrase this as “if you don’t use ten dollar words all the time, don’t use them in your writing, even if you get them half-off. You’ll probably mis-use them.” Something else – spelling counts. Spell-check is great in most cases, but if you use a homophones – and yes, I had to check the definition of this – such as “hear” or “here”, spell-check won’t catch it. Proofread, then proofread again.

There. My courses on photography and writing are finished. As the title suggests “do it your way.” Class dismissed.

Remember to hug an artist – we need love too.

Cat.

Bring him to justice – on Canadian soil

“He’s back.” Those are the words that greeted me when I answered an early morning phone call today.

George Flowers, aka Mr Flowas, has been returned from Jamaica, processed, charged with several counts of aggravated sexual assault and currently sits in a jail cell somewhere in or around Toronto. Not sure when he will appear in court for a bail hearing, but my best guess is sometime today. In my view, this will be a mere formality and bail will be denied as he is a flight risk – it just took almost four years to get him from Jamaica. As and when more information becomes available and can be confirmed, I’ll post it.

Once again, if you had sexual relations with this man but didn’t come forward earlier because you didn’t think he’d be caught or were afraid, well, they caught him. He’s in jail. And don’t be afraid any longer. Please contact Detective Sergeant Nancy Johnston at the Toronto Police Service, 55 Division, at 416-808-5505. You don’t have to have tested positive – DS Johnston wants to hear from you.

Cat.

Bring him to justice – latest news

Flowers will be returning to Toronto tomorrow, June 22. According to the officer in charge, once he is processed, there will be a press conference. My guess is either very late tomorrow or early Friday.

As I wrote previously, if you dated this man and haven’t come forward, please contact Detective Nancy Johnston at 55 Division, Toronto Police Service at 416-808-5505.

Cat.

(Posted from my phone. When I get home tomorrow, I’ll do a proper edit). C

Bring him to justice – coming home

I’ve waited a long time to write these words: I have received and confirmed information that George Flowers will be returning to Toronto on June 21 accompanied by a member of the Toronto Police Service. This has been a long time coming because his legal counsel exhausted every possible legal means to keep him in Jamaica.

I urge any of my followers and readers that if you have had sexual relations with this man, or know anyone who has, to come forward if you haven’t already done so. Contact Detective Sergeant Nancy Johnston at 55 Division, Toronto Police Service, at 416-808-5505. As Detective Johnston told me when I first started writing about this, you don’t need to have tested positive to have a valid complaint. Just the fact you had relations without knowing his status is enough.

Cat.